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Monday, May 2, 2011

Osama, War, Peace

Last night, as I was finishing watching "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire" (I'm making my way through the movies again) I got a text message from my friend Ashley who said, "Osama has been killed.  Turn on CNN, the president is speaking soon."

My first response?  "Awesome, thanks!"

My next thought?  "Did I just say awesome?  Is it really awesome when ANYONE'S life is taken?  I can't believe I texted that to my new friend Ashley... I hope she doesn't think less of me."

I dunno.  It's a hard situation.  As a Christian I don't think it's okay to rejoice in anyone's death.  Yet I recognize that Osama bin Laden was a man who killed MANY and who has SO much blood on his hands.  As do we as Americans.

Last night Rachel Held Evans tweeted, "“Trying to keep in mind that how I respond to the death of my enemies says as much about me as it does about my enemies."  And I totally understand that, and agree.

The Vatican released this statement:
Osama bin Laden, as we all know, bore the most serious responsibility for spreading divisions and hatred among populations, causing the deaths of innumerable people, and manipulating religions for this purpose.

In the face of a man’s death, a Christian never rejoices, but reflects on the serious responsibilities of each person before God and before men, and hopes and works so that every event may be the occasion for the further growth of peace and not of hatred.
Yes.

My friend Trisha's husband has PTSD from him time in Iraq and Afghanistan, and she says this has really set him back; he doesn't know how to respond.  "Mission completed." He doesn't think this will change much.  He doesn't know how to feel.  He didn't sleep last night.

That's really all I have to say on the subject.  It's a weird day. 

1 comment:

  1. You are right - we don't rejoice over the death of our enemies, BUT we don't condemn their killing either. Read Romans 13. "But if you do wrong, be afraid, for he does not bear the sword for nothing. He is God's servant, an agent of wrath to bring punishment on the wrongdoer." (Paul is speaking of the government) God directed Israel to kill the wicked people before them as well. Sometimes evil must be done to prevent a greater evil.

    Will much change? Hard to say. But a symbol has been removed, and the warning "be afraid" has been instilled in those who thought they were untouchable.

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